Thursday, January 18, 2018
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Zika Virus

aegyptiZika virus is spread to people through mosquito bites. The most common symptoms of Zika virus disease are fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis (red eyes). The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting from several days to a week. Severe disease requiring hospitalization is uncommon.

In May 2015, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) issued an alert regarding the first confirmed Zika virus infection in Brazil. The outbreak in Brazil led to reports of Guillain-Barré syndrome and pregnant women giving birth to babies with birth defects and poor pregnancy outcomes. Prior to 2015, Zika virus outbreaks have occurred in areas of Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands.

CDC has issued a travel alert (Level 2-Practice Enhanced Precautions) for people traveling to regions and certain countries where Zika virus transmission is ongoing. If you are planning to travel to areas where Zika Virus is active in ongoing transmission you are advised to obtain and use insect repellants that contain DEET. Women, in particular those who already are pregnant or may become pregnant during or immediately after travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, are advised to obtain and use insect repellants that contain DEET during the duration of their time abroad or are advised to reconsider travel to these areas.

 

Questions and Answers about Zika Virus and Preganancyalbo

CDC Zika Virus Health Advisory 

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services Zika Health Advisory

3-18-16 Public Health Message

CDC Zika Tavel Health Notices

How Is Zika Virus Spread?

Zika virus is spread to person to person through mosquito bites.

What are Symptoms of Zika Virus?

The most common symptoms of Zika virus disease are:

  • fever,
  • rash,
  • joint pain,
  • conjunctivitis (red eyes).

The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting from several days to a week. Severe disease requiring hospitalization is uncommon.

The virus is spread by the Yellow Fever Mosquito (Aedes aegypti) mosquito and can also be spread by the Asian Tiger Mosquito (Aedes albopictus) mosquito.
It is estimated that the virus infects 1 in 5 people exposed to infected mosquitoes.

Zika virus will continue to spread and it will be difficult to determine how the virus will spread over time.

Zika virus and Mosquito breeding sources. Tips for how to eliminate mosquito breeding sources around your home.

Examples of mosquito breeding sources. Eliminate these altogether or treat with a mosquito larvacide. Any source of water that can hold water for more than 7 days can breed mosquitoes.

Breeding source elimination and self protection tips to reduce exposure to mosquitoes.

Questions and Answers about Zika Virus

Information for Health Care Providers

Guidance for Obstetrical Health Care Providers

Interim Guidance For Pregnant Women

Questions and Answers for Obstetrical Health Care Providers 

Zika in the United States and its territories  

No locally transmitted Zika cases have been reported in the continental United States, but cases have been reported in returning travelers.
Locally transmitted Zika virus has been reported in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
With the recent outbreaks, the number of Zika cases among travelers visiting or returning to the United States will likely increase.
These imported cases could result in local spread of the virus in some areas of the United States.

The World Health Organization has advised that the Zika Virus will become active in nearly every nation in the Western Hemisphere with the exception of Canada and Peru. 

Zika Virus transmission in the U.S. may be dependent upon several factors. Individuals infected abroad may return with the virus. Once they return and they become ill they would need to be fed upon by either an Aedes aegypti mosquito or an Aedes albopictus mosquito. Those mosquitoes then become infected and are capable of spreading it to other persons if they need to obtain more blood meals. Factors encouraging the spread of Zika locally would be determined by the availability of Aedes aegypti (not currently in Missouri) or the Aedes albopictus. Currently found in Missouri. Other factors include the availability of air conditioning and window screens. These alone can help reduce the potential for a local outbreak of the virus. However individuals who travel abroad and return home then become ill are encouraged to use DEET based insect repellent to reduce the potential of being used by mosquitoes as a source for blood meals and encouraged to stay indoors during the period in which they can infect mosquitoes. (the first week of their illness)

 

 

Obstetrical

Chikungunya Virus

Symptoms

Chikungunya (pronunciation: \chik-en-gun-ye) virus is transmitted to people by mosquitoes. The most common symptoms of chikungunya virus infection are fever and joint pain. Other symptoms may include headache, muscle pain, joint swelling, or rash. Outbreaks have occurred throughout Africa, Asia, Europe, and islands in Indian and Pacific Oceans. The virus is transmittable from one person to another by mosquito bite.

If you have traveled outside the United States and you are experiencing symptoms like those mentioned here it is important  you seek medical attention. It is also critical that you avoid exposure to mosquitoes locally if experienceing these symptoms or if you have been diagnosed with Chikungunya as it is possible for you to spread the disease to local mosquitoes. 

Recent History

In December of 2013, chikungunya virus was found for the first time in the Americas on islands in the Caribbean. There is a risk that the virus will be imported to new areas by infected travelers. There is no vaccine to prevent or medicine to treat chikungunya virus infection. Travelers can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites. When traveling to countries with chikungunya virus, use insect repellent, wear long sleeves and pants, and stay in places with air conditioning or that use window and door screens.

Since Chikungunya appeared in the western hemisphere over 1.2 million individuals have become infected involving 44 countries. In the United States the virus has been found in travelers returning from traveling abroad. These traveler related infections involve 48 states including Missouri. As of February 2015 7,005 cases of Chikungunya infections have occured in the United States and its territories. Of these 11 cases were infected locally in the State of Florida, 4,467 were infected locally in the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

CDC Map of Geographic Distribution of Chikungunya

CDC Map of Geographic Distribution of Chikungunya in the United States 2015

CDC Map of Geographic Distribution of Chikungunya in the United State 2014

 

Vectors

The disease is known to be capable of transmission by two mosquito species. One of these, the asian tiger mosquito exists prominently in Missouri.

Self Protection and Prevention

Elimination of man-made standing water sources is the best way to eliminate the species of mosquitoes that carry the virus. Any container item capable of holding water for seven days or more should be removed, altered or inverted. Examples of the types of breeding sources include but are not limited to: aluminum cans, buckets, swimming or wading pools, tarps, flower pot sill plates, clogged gutters, food packaging, wheel barrows, bird baths, tires, bottle caps, or any man made item that are capable of holding water. 

The mosquito species that transmits the West Nile Virus is typically active from dusk to dawn. When outside at any time or in areas where mosquitoes are active the best defense against mosquitoes is to use insect repellents that contain DEET, Picaridin or Oil of Eucalyptus. Don't apply repellants that contain permethrin to bare skin. These are meant to be applied to clothing only. If weather permits use of long sleeves and long pants is advised. 

Information for Health Care Providers

CDC Information for Health Care Providers

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services Health Guidance Document July 2014

 

 

 

Farmers Markets

Farmers-Market-foodsThe Jefferson County Health Department recognizes that the direct marketing of agricultural products through Farmers’ Markets is desirable and should be promoted not only as an integral part of Missouri culture, but that such markets, when properly operated, provide a social and economic benefit to both the agricultural community and Missouri citizens by providing items such as fresh, local produce, fruits, nuts, grains, honey, jams, jellies, non-potentially hazardous foods such as baked goods, and livestock and pet stock at reasonable prices, in a socially significant setting.

There are currently five Farmers’ Markets operating in our county during the spring, summer, and fall months.  The markets are located in Arnold, Byrnes Mill, De Soto, Herculaneum, and Hillsboro.  Each market is run by Market Masters who are trained by the Jefferson County Health Department. The Arnold, Byrnes Mill, and De Soto Markets have websites containing contact information.  If you need to contact one of the other markets, please call Nancy Radoch at the Jefferson County Health Department.   She can be reached at 636-789-3372 extension 115, Monday through Thursday 8AM to 5:30 PM.

 

 

 

 

Document Center

Important documents are listed below.

 

Food Service Documents

The Jefferson County Food Code is adopted from the 2013 FDA and Missouri State Food Codes. It is implemented under the authority of the Jefferson County Food Service Sanitation Order and enforced in conjunction with the Jefferson County Missouri Food Service and Retail Food Service Sanitation Rules and Regulations.

Jefferson County Food Service Sanitation Order

Jefferson County Food Code

Jefferson County Missouri Food Service and Retail Food Service Sanitation Rules and Regulations

Permit Application (Temporary Food Stand? See Temporary Food Service Requirements and Application below)

Temporary Food Service Requirements

Temporary Food Service Permit Application

Mobile Food Establishment Permit Requirements

Process Authority (For those seeking guidance in Food Processing)

Farmers Markets

Farmers Market Master Training Manual

Mosquito and Vector Control

Temporary Mosquito Control Protocol

2007 Mosquito Control and West Nile Response Plan

Mosquito Control and Eradication Order

Laboratory services

Explanation of Unsatisfactory Bacteriological Water Sample Results

Procedure for Well Disinfection

Procedure for Eliminating "Rotten Egg Odor" from Hot Water

Chemicals and Elements Screened by Jefferson County Health Department Lab

Sexually Oriented Business Ordinance

Jefferson County Sexually Oriented Business Ordinance

Jefferson County Quarantine and Isolation Ordinance

Childcare Sanitation


childcare blocksThe Jefferson County Health Department, Environmental Services section conducts sanitation inspections of licensed home childcare and licensed child care centers in Jefferson County. These inspections are conducted for the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services Bureau of Childcare Safety and Regulation.

Inspections are conducted to ensure that basic sanitation requirements of these facilities are being met as required by regulation.

To learn more information go to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services Childcare MDHSS Childcare webpage.

To search the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services Childcare webpage for a childcare provider go to the department's facility search page.

Licensed child care facility staff must meet Jefferson County Health Department's food safety training requirements. Child care center managers and home daycare providers must be ServSafe Certified or equivalent. Employees of centers and home day cares must be Basic Sanitation trained or equivalent. Contact the Jefferson County Health Department for more information. 

 

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